The Southern Center for Human Rights

HEADLINES

  • 19th February 2005

    The state hasn't kept its agreement to improve its medical care to HIV inmates at Limestone Correctional Facility, say attorneys for inmate plaintiffs.

    Attorneys with the Southern Center for Human Rights filed a contempt motion Friday, alleging that the prison has done little in the eight months since the settlement to ensure adequate medical care for the HIV-positive men housed there.

  • 18th November 2004
    State to make Alto mostly for women

    Corrections officials are making sweeping changes to a North Georgia prison where, critics charge, some of the state's youngest inmates are regularly subjected to rapes and other brutal attacks.

    The state plans to turn Lee Arrendale State Prison in Alto into a women's prison, according to documents obtained by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

  • 16th November 2004
    State sued for not stopping rapes, threats, especially at young Lee Arrendale inmates

    Two inmates offered sordid, chilling accounts in federal court Tuesday of life in a northeast Georgia prison where prisoners fight to survive in a toxic atmosphere of threats, rape and violence.

    Lawyers for the Southern Center for Human Rights are asking a federal judge to force the state Department of Corrections to take immediate steps to stop a string of violent attacks and sexual assaults at Lee Arrendale State Prison in Alto.

  • 3rd November 2004

    Willie Floyd Williams Jr. spent eight months in the Clinch County Jail before he could post bail. But before he could leave, Williams was told to report to a deputy sheriff, who informed him he owed $4,608 to cover his jail costs.

    After Williams signed a promissory note pledging to pay $20 per week until the balance was cleared, he was finally released. In the note, Williams acknowledged that if he failed to pay, he would be thrown back in jail.

  • 12th August 2004
    Family members and lawyers describe assaults of teens in prison

    Wayne Boatwright Sr. couldn't hold back tears as he told legislators about the death of his 18-year-old son, Wayne Boatwright Jr. He was strangled to death in February at Lee Arrendale State Prison, where children between the ages of 13 and 17 found guilty of one of seven violent felonies are sent. Once there, they often are preyed upon by the prison's older population, documents show.

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