HEADLINES

  • 15th December 2009
      Against all Odds, SCHR Triumphs in 2009 Georgia General Assembly
  • 15th December 2009

  • 12th December 2009

    MONTGOMERY, AL — The Southern Center for Human Rights (SCHR) is disappointed by the Commissioner’s statement of December 9, 2009 regarding violence at Donaldson Correctional Facility.  A more appropriate response would have been to apologize to the public for providing erroneous information and to promise to make public the result of an investigation into how these errors occurred.  

  • 12th December 2009

    Almost 200 convicted felons are without lawyers to file their appeals because there is no money to pay for them,  according to a lawsuit filed Tuesday. Some inmates have been waiting more than three years and more than half have been waiting at least a year for appointed appellate counsel, said the suit, filed in Fulton County Superior Court. It seeks an order requiring the state public defender system to provide lawyers for these inmates.

  • 9th December 2009

    MONTGOMERY, AL — The Alabama Department of Corrections (ADOC) has repeatedly released inaccurate information to the public, significantly underreporting the number of persons assaulted in state custody, according to an analysis by the Southern Center for Human Rights (SCHR).  SCHR recently confirmed that the ADOC failed to report to the public numerous assaults that occurred at one Alabama prison, Donaldson Correctional Facility, over at least one year.

  • 2nd December 2009

    Sara Totonchi, the longtime public policy director and media strategist for the Southern Center for Human Rights, will become the prisoner rights group's new executive director on Jan 1.

    Totonchi will be the first non-lawyer to run the group, taking over from Lisa L. Kung, who joined as a staff attorney in 1999. Stephen B. Bright, the center's driving force for 27 years, tapped Kung to replace him as executive director in 2006, to free him up for more lawyering and teaching.

  • 24th November 2009

    A national gay rights group filed a federal lawsuit Tuesday against the city of Atlanta and the Atlanta Police Department on behalf of 19 people who say they were illegally searched and detained during a late-night raid on a crowded gay bar.

  • 15th November 2009

    Maybe nowhere else is the saying "money talks" more true than in courts such as Richmond County State Court.  Someone who can afford to pay off fines assessed for traffic and other misdemeanor offenses can usually walk out of court a free person. Anyone who can't pay might find himself entangled in the system with a financial debt that keeps growing as he faces the prospect of either paying the court or going to jail.

  • 20th September 2009

    The Georgia Supreme Court will hear arguments Monday in a Richmond County case that pits the government and a private company against a pro bono attorney hoping the court will end the use of private, for-profit probation companies.

    Earlier this year, Superior Court Chief Judge J. Carlisle Overstreet reversed Lisa Harrelson's misdemeanor conviction and ordered Sentinel Offender Services to return the $500 she had paid in fines and fees.

    Sentinel and the state, through Richmond County State Court Solicitor Harold Jones, appealed the ruling.

  • 8th September 2009

    ATLANTA -- The wheels of justice in Georgia are grinding more slowly each day.

    Cuts in spending for the state court system have led to fewer court dates available for hearings and trials, creating a growing backlog of cases. With serious criminal matters being heard first, delays are stretching to months for many civil, domestic and minor criminal cases.

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