HEADLINES

  • 23rd January 2006

    Last July, a homeless man named Hubert Lindsey was stopped by police officers in Gulfport, Miss., for riding his bicycle without a light. The police soon discovered that Lindsey was a wanted man. Gulfport records showed he owed $4,780 in old fines. So, off to jail he went.

  • 27th August 2005

    Wthin weeks of taking office, Gulfport Mayor Brent Warr has demonstrated an admirable willingness to correct what appears to be a long-standing complaint with the city's Municipal Court - without being dragged into federal court. And just as admirably, those who have leveled the justifiable criticism at the Municipal Court have demonstrated a willingness to work with the mayor and city officials.

  • 3rd August 2005

    GULFPORT - Mayor Brent Warr has promised to correct problems that have earned Gulfport Municipal Court the reputation of being "the worst in the state."

    In comments at an NAACP meeting Tuesday night, Warr responded to allegations of illegal practices in city court by pledging fairness to all, to include indigent people who can't afford to pay misdemeanor fines within 30 days.

  • 1st August 2005

    HARVEST, Ala. - If there was ever a prison that needed help, it was Limestone Correctional Facility.

    Even within the troubled Alabama penal system, this state compound near Huntsville was notorious for cruel punishment and medical neglect. In one drafty, rat-infested warehouse once reserved for chain gangs, the state quarantined its male prisoners with H.I.V. and AIDS, until the extraordinary death toll - 36 inmates from 1999 to 2002 - moved inmates to sue and the government to promise change.

  • 23rd July 2005

    GULFPORT - A federal lawsuit claims the City of Gulfport and its Municipal Court have created a modern-day debtors' prison.

    The lawsuit, filed Thursday, alleges the city and court officials have abused their authority by putting indigent people in jail for failure to pay misdemeanor fines. It also alleges a special unit of police officers "troll the streets," primarily in predominantly black neighborhoods, looking for people who have past-due court fines.

    The civil lawsuit represents only one side of a complaint.

  • 5th May 2005

    Alabama's prison medical provider is losing $1.2 million from the state because it has not provided enough doctors and nurses to state prisons.

    Prison Health Services has not fulfilled minimal contract requirements that call for a certain number of doctors, nurses, administrators and support staff. The company is not being fined, Department of Corrections spokesman Brian Corbett said, but DOC will not have to pay $1.2 million of its contract.

  • 1st April 2005
    State inmates seek change from cells in Louisiana lock-up

    Alabama female prisoners locked in a rural Louisiana prison are demanding changes they say could give them a fairer shot at parole and curb the state's reliance on private, for-profit lockups.

  • 19th February 2005

    The state hasn't kept its agreement to improve its medical care to HIV inmates at Limestone Correctional Facility, say attorneys for inmate plaintiffs.

    Attorneys with the Southern Center for Human Rights filed a contempt motion Friday, alleging that the prison has done little in the eight months since the settlement to ensure adequate medical care for the HIV-positive men housed there.

  • 18th November 2004
    State to make Alto mostly for women

    Corrections officials are making sweeping changes to a North Georgia prison where, critics charge, some of the state's youngest inmates are regularly subjected to rapes and other brutal attacks.

    The state plans to turn Lee Arrendale State Prison in Alto into a women's prison, according to documents obtained by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

  • 16th November 2004
    State sued for not stopping rapes, threats, especially at young Lee Arrendale inmates

    Two inmates offered sordid, chilling accounts in federal court Tuesday of life in a northeast Georgia prison where prisoners fight to survive in a toxic atmosphere of threats, rape and violence.

    Lawyers for the Southern Center for Human Rights are asking a federal judge to force the state Department of Corrections to take immediate steps to stop a string of violent attacks and sexual assaults at Lee Arrendale State Prison in Alto.

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