SCHR Resources Search

  • 27th May 2004
    Limestone HIV unit's facilities, delays in pill distribution cited

    Alabama prison officials have agreed to provide dozens of improvements to the medical care and treatment of Alabama's HIV-positive prisoners to settle a federal lawsuit.

    The Alabama Department of Corrections also must submit its HIV unit at Limestone prison to two years of monitoring by a medical consultant, who will visit quarterly to make sure prisoners are treated in accordance with national standards.

  • 26th October 2003

    Robin Nelson/ZUMA Press

    Prisoners lining up for their AIDS medication last March at the Limestone Correctional Facility, where they are segregated from the other inmates.

    HARVEST, Ala. — Prisoners who need AIDS or H.I.V. medication at the Limestone Correctional Facility here must get up at 3 in the morning to stand in line for it. The wait can take 45 minutes. Then they repeat the exercise at 10 in the morning, and again at 3 in the afternoon.

    Those who are too sleepy or sick to stand in line miss out, a federal lawsuit maintains.

  • 13th February 2003

    MONTGOMERY: A medical consultant's audit of health-care services in Alabama prisons found "dangerous and extremely poor quality health care" at Limestone Correctional Facility at Capshaw.

    Reports from visits Oct. 1 and Nov. 8 by Chicago-based Jacqueline Moore and Associates said the death rate from AIDS at Limestone is more than twice the national average in prisons and that efforts to control infectious and communicable diseases at Limestone were not adequately monitored or reported. Most of the state's inmates with AIDS are confined at the north Alabama prison.

  • 28th August 2006

    What's happening in a lawsuit over medical care at Tutwiler Prison for Women may be a rare win-win in a system far more accustomed to lose-lose propositions.

    A new deal between lawyers for Tutwiler inmates and the Department of Corrections calls for up to six years of reviews by a new monitor for the federal court. Under an earlier settlement, the state would have faced four more years of monitoring.

  • 1st April 2005
    State inmates seek change from cells in Louisiana lock-up

    Alabama female prisoners locked in a rural Louisiana prison are demanding changes they say could give them a fairer shot at parole and curb the state's reliance on private, for-profit lockups.

  • 29th June 2004

    Alabama's female prisoners may soon live with fewer roaches and spiders in their dorms.

    They could get more ice, fans and showers at Tutwiler Prison for Women, where summer temperatures regularly rise above 85 degrees. And they could have access to better medical care, more classes and more drug treatment.

    It took a federal lawsuit to bring about basic, constitutional conditions at Alabama's only women's prison. A two-part settlement in the case was filed Monday. It awaits the approval of U.S. District Judge Myron Thompson.

  • 8th April 2003
    WETUMPKA - A copy of the U.S. Constitution hangs in one of the inmate dorms in Julia Tutwiler Prison for Women.

    The dorm's walls are painted a medicinal pink, thought to be soothing for the recovering addicts assigned to this particular dorm, which is funded by federal crime prevention money. Inmates are taught to be patriotic in the "crime bill" dorm.

  • 20th December 2002
    Health care claims latest woes in corrections calamity

    The allegations of poor medical care at Alabama's prisons for women make them sound more like concentration camps: Female inmates sometimes pull their own teeth, are denied cancer treatment, don't receive medicine for diabetes and psychiatric disorders, and live with untreated gynecological problems, according to new claims added to an ongoing federal lawsuit against the state.

  • 5th December 2002
    State must deal with overburdened prison system

    It's understandable that Bob Riley would want to delay the adoption of any plan to ease overcrowding at the Tutwiler prison for women until after he takes office as governor next month. As his spokesman says, meeting the Dec. 30 court-imposed deadline would lock the incoming Riley administration to a plan hastily put together by the outgoing Siegelman administration.

  • 15th January 2003
    No constitutional right is celebrated so much in the abstract and observed so little in reality as the right to counsel.

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