SCHR Resources Search

  • 17th November 2008

    ATLANTA , GEORGIA, August 15, 2006 –  Today, Bulloch County Sheriff Lynn Anderson agreed to halt enforcement of the school bus stop provision of HB 1059, Georgia’s Sex Offender legislation passed by the General Assembly in 2006. Yesterday, attorneys from the Southern Center for Human Rights (SCHR) and the American Civil Liberties Union of Georgia asked the Court for a Temporary Restraining Order to stop the Bulloch County Sheriff from illegally evicting people from their homes for living too close to a school bus stop.

  • 17th November 2008

    ATLANTA , GEORGIA, August 14, 2006 –  Attorneys from the Southern Center for Human Rights (SCHR) and the American Civil Liberties Union of Georgia have filed another challenge to HB 1059, Georgia’s sex offender legislation passed in 2006 by the General Assembly.  Today, attorneys have asked the Court for a Temporary Restraining Order to stop the Bulloch County Sheriff from illegally evicting people from their homes for living too close to a school bus stop.

  • 17th November 2008

    ATLANTA , GEORGIA, July 27, 2006 – Today, attorneys on behalf of people on Georgia’s Sex Offender Registry ask attorneys for local School Boards to advise their clients not to officially designate school bus stops.  Parties also return to Court tomorrow, with three new defendants: counties in the Augusta Judicial District that have renewed efforts to evict people on the registry from their homes.

  • 17th November 2008

    ATLANTA , GEORGIA, July 26, 2006 – Today, attorneys from the Southern Center for Human Rights and the American Civil Liberties Union of Georgia have asked the Court for a Temporary Restraining Order to stop Sheriffs in Columbia, Richmond, and Burke Counties from illegally evicting people from their homes for living within 1000 feet of a school bus stop.

  • 17th November 2008

    The Court today ruled that law enforcement officials in Georgia do not need to waste their resources trying to enforce HB 1059's bus stop provision.  This is because, at this time, there is nothing to enforce.

    We are in this mess because HB 1059 was a sloppily written and counterproductive law. It was intended to destroy lives by forcefully evicting thousands of Georgians from their homes, and that would have made all of us less safe in the process.  The Court's decision today saved us from such a disaster.

  • 17th November 2008
    State attorneys at odds with Legislature, Sheriffs over bus stops

  • 17th November 2008

    The Court's order extends the Temporary Restraining Order to anyone on the registry who lives within 1000 feet of the school bus stop.  This means that people like Wendy Whitaker, who is on the registry because she had consensual sex with a classmate when she was 17, can stay home this weekend without fear of being thrown in prison for 10 years.  It means that people on the registry who are in treatment can continue going to treatment; people are going to be able to maintain the stability that is so important to us all.

  • 17th November 2008

    The Court's Temporary Restraining Order today did two very important things: it noted that the bus stop provision in HB 1059 is probably unconstitutional, and it recognized that the bus stop provision will have the perverse effect of putting the public in greater danger by making it harder to monitor people who are currently on the registry.

  • 17th November 2008
    ROME, GEORGIA , Tuesday June 20, 2006 – A class action lawsuit is being filed today in U.S. District Court challenging HB 1059, the Georgia sex offender legislation passed in 2006 by the General Assembly. Lawyers from the Southern Center for Human Rights (SCHR) and the American Civil Liberties Union of Georgia are asking the Court to stop the enforcement of HB 1059, scheduled to go into effect on July 1, 2006.
  • 4th November 2008

    Willie Floyd Williams Jr. spent eight months in the Clinch County Jail before he could post bail. But before he could leave, Williams was told to report to a deputy sheriff, who informed him he owed $4,608 to cover his jail costs.

    After Williams signed a promissory note pledging to pay $20 per week until the balance was cleared, he was finally released. In the note, Williams acknowledged that if he failed to pay, he would be thrown back in jail.

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